How to make your own glow-in-the-dark deep sea fish

24 07 2013

Background information: Ocean creatures that live in the deep ocean where there is no light often carry a light source of their own. Sometimes, they have special cells that can make light the way fireflies do. Just as often, the light comes from bacteria that live in and on the sea creatures. For example, the flashlight fish has light spots beneath its eyes. These spots are home to millions of luminescent bacteria. The bacteria get nourishment from the fish and the fish gets to have light. Light is important for catching food. Also, light can aid in confusing larger predators.

For this art project, you will need:

-Black paper

-Scissors

-Glow in the Dark paint

-Hole puncher

-String

Directions:

  1. Cut out a shape of a fish from the black piece of paperImage
  2. Decorate the fish with the glow-in-the-dark paintIMG_0436
  3. Wait for the paint to dry
  4. Hole punch a hole on the top of the fish & tie a string in itImage
  5. Hold your fish up to the light to charge it upImage
  6. Hang your fish, turn the lights off and watch it swim & flow!Image




Exploring Local History

23 08 2012

This summer we’ve been writing about how the Museum is creating an archive that will live on a computer. We’re doing this by digitizing things!

Digitizing is when you take something non-digital (like a paper letter or a print photograph) and turn it into something digital that lives on a computer. People use things like scanners to create a digital copy of something. We have a scanner here at the museum that we’re using to digitize things like old photographs.

Why do people digitize things? When something like a photograph is digital, you can do lots of cool thing with it. We found a neat website recently that is using old, digitized photographs in fun ways.

Historypin lets you explore cities by looking at old photographs. The cool part is that all of these photographs are put on a map, so you can see how familiar places used to look a long time ago. You can find pictures of Austin dating back to the 1800s on Historypin!

Another site that lets you explore maps and old photographs is Sepia Town.

Try exploring places you’ve visited and see how much things have changed over time.





Harness the Heat: Make Your Own Solar Oven!

16 08 2012

How do solar ovens work? Well, as you can tell from your day-to-day observations, the sun not only provides light, but also works as a heat source.  That’s why it’s warmer during the day, when the sun is out, than it is at night, when the moon is up.  With a solar oven, you use reflectors (aluminum foil) to reflect the sun’s light into a closed container and the heat is trapped inside.  With this heat, you can cook some really great snacks!

If you do make a solar oven, remember that the oven can get very hot (just like ovens in kitchens), so you should be very careful when using the oven. Heat-resistant cloths or hand covers are great ways to protect yourself from the heat.

To make your own solar oven, you will need the following materials:

- a pizza box

- aluminum foil

- plastic wrap

- tape

- pen or pencil

- scissors

- ruler

First take your pizza box and draw a square around the lid of the pizza box about two inches from the edges.  Cut along only three edges: the front and sides of the pizza box.  Do not cut the fourth side that runs along the back of the pizza box.

 

Fold along the uncut line so that you form a flap.  After folding the flap back, wrap it in a piece of aluminum foil and tape it down.  Make sure that the shiny side is facing out and that there are no wrinkles in the foil.

 

Next, open up the pizza box and cover the insides with foil.  Make sure to cover the bottom and the sides of the pizza box.  Have the shiny side of the foil face up and overlap the pieces to cover any gaps. Tape into place.

 

While the pizza box is open, we’re going to cover the hole made by the foil-covered flap with plastic wrap.  Before cutting a piece of plastic wrap, you can tape down one side and then unroll the plastic wrap across the hole.  Make sure the plastic wrap is the right size and that it is taped down tightly so that no air can get out.

After these steps, you’ve completed your solar oven!

 

Click for more to see how to make some yummy food with your new solar oven!

Read the rest of this entry »





Story Time Library: Let’s Get Organized!

13 08 2012

Hi ACM Blog readers!

I’m Melody,  a summer intern here at the museum, helping out with our archival projects, as well as with the Story Time library.

Each day before Story Time, our readers choose a few great stories from a whole collection of books here at the museum.  Sometimes, the books can get a little messy and hard to find.

Photo by Prio on Flickr

That’s why this summer, I have been finding new ways to organize them and clean the shelves up a bit!

In the Story Time Library, I have been using some fun, new colorful labels to help people find books that fall under certain topics.  Each color stands for a different topic: Green = Environment, Blue = Ocean, Orange = Mammals, Red = Food, etc.  If one day, a Story Time reader wants books about dogs, cats, and pizza, he or she can just look through the books labeled with an orange and/or red sticker!  Easy, right?

There are lots of great ways to group together similar things, not just for your books.

Activity: Organizing Time!

Try going through your bedroom or playroom to organize things like:

  • Clothes
  • Toys
  • School/art supplies
  • DVDs
  • Video games

Find a creative and fun way to group them together, so that they will be easier for you to find later on!  Maybe you can organize your movies and games alphabetically and your clothes by color and style. You could label different tubs or boxes with the words “Pens”, “Pencils”, “Markers”, and “Crayons”, so that your school and art supplies will stay where they are supposed to.

Any way you do it, make sure it helps you stay clean and organized!

Photo by jenni waterloo on Flickr
Group things by color!

Photo by matthew_moss on Flickr
Organize office supplies!





Woodcrafting 101 Workshop!

9 08 2012

Last weekend at our Museum we had our Woodcrafting 101 Workshop where kids of all ages made their very own woven latices! The process consisted of four easy steps and young boys and girls were able to learn about tools and their functions while they built and decorated their own latice.

An example of a woven latice that Matt made!

Here are the four steps the kids went through in order to make this neat craft!

1. First, the children started out with two 16 inch pieces of wood and measured and marked 1 inch holes for the drilling process later on. Then the children cut the two pieces of wood in half with a dovetail saw and ended up with four 8 inch pieces of wood!

Learning how to mark and measure.

Learning how to use the dovetail saw to cut the pieces of wood in half!

2. Second, the children brought their four pieces of cut wood to be drilled. We showed them how to use a drill and used a larger sized bit for the holes on the ends and a smaller sized bit for all of the other holes. We made sure to wear goggles at all times to protect our eyes!

After cutting the wood, the next step was to drill the holes!

Showing the kids how to use a drill safely.

Making sure to always wear goggles and hold the drill downward at a straight angle.

3. Next the kids took their newly drilled pieces of wood over to the nuts and bolts station where they assembled the frame to their latice! We showed them how to put the frame together using nuts and bolts and how to tighten it with a wrench.

The third step is to assemble the frame!

The kids learned how to use nuts and bolts to put the pieces of wood together.

Learning how to use a wrench to tighten the nuts and bolts.

4. The last and final step was to weave different colored yarn and string through the holes that they drilled earlier with a plastic needle.

The last step is to decorate the latice by weaving different colored string through the holes!

The children got to pick what colors and kinds of string they wanted to use for their latice!

The kids learned how to use a plastic needle to weave the string through the holes of the frame.

Who knew that working with tools could be so fun?! The children were able to learn how to use simple materials and tools to make an awesome craft that they got to take home! Kids and parents had a great time learning how to build a woven latice!

Everyone had a great time at our woodcraft workshop!





Adventures in Archiving at ACM

6 08 2012

We’re doing some spring (or summer!) cleaning here at the Museum.  But we aren’t just throwing things away. Instead, we’re archiving them!

What is an archive? An archive is a place where people store old things to keep them in good condition. Archives can be filled with things like books, letters, poems, postcards, photographs … all sorts of things, really. The United States has its very own National Archives, where all sorts of papers important to American history are stored.

Just think of how much paper is in here!
Image by David Samuel, Wikimedia Commons

The museum archive isn’t going to be in a big building though. Instead, it’s going to be on the computer. The museum is scanning paper documents and creating a digital archive of everything from old photographs to brainstorming sketches.

This summer and fall, we’ll be posting about our adventures in archiving. And we’ll give you some ideas for ways you can archive things at home!

Activity: Start your own archive!
Before you start an archive, you have to find things to put in it. Try going on an archival scavenger hunt in your house!   You can see if your relatives and older friends have already started saving things like photographs. Ask how they saved those things and why.

Here are some old things to look for.

  • Black and white photographs
  • Records or CDs
  • Old postcards and letters
  • Newspaper clippings

What cool old things have you found around your house? Happy hunting!





Create your own Motion Ocean!

25 07 2012

In the next couple of weeks our Museum we will be having our Under the Sea and Extreme Planet camps where we will be exploring crazy weather phenomenas and learning about the ocean as well as the many plants and animals that call the ocean home! Here’s a simple experiment to help you start thinking about the many wonders of the ocean

You will need:

  • A  clear container with a lid (can be plastic or glass)
  • Blue food coloring
  • Some glitter (optional)
  • Baby oil or cooking oil
  • Small plastic floating toys

To make your own motion ocean just follow these simple steps!

    1. First, fill half of your container with water
    2. Then add a few drops of food coloring into the water and add some glitter too if you want!
    3. Pour in the baby oil/cooking oil until the container is about 3/4 full
    4. Add your favorite floating plastic toys on top of the oil
    5. Put the lid on the container
    6. Shake up your very own motion ocean!

Since water is denser or heavier than the oil it stays at the bottom while the oil stays at the top of the container. Since the two liquids never mix the water pushes the oil around at the surface making it look similar to waves in the ocean. Try creating your own motion ocean and let us know how yours turned out!








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